• Colin Steele, Chairman of Allen and Unwin Patrick Gallagher and Deb Stevens

    Colin Steele, Chairman of Allen and Unwin Patrick Gallagher and Deb Stevens

  • Kathryn and John Morris

    Kathryn and John Morris

  • Adam Moorehouse, Chris Fitzpatrick and Bill Ruse

    Adam Moorehouse, Chris Fitzpatrick and Bill Ruse

  • Noel Haberecht and Richard Haberecht

    Noel Haberecht and Richard Haberecht

  • Peter McGrath and Tim Gavel

    Peter McGrath and Tim Gavel

  • Jacob Whittley and Angus Stormon

    Jacob Whittley and Angus Stormon

  • Najiba Sikandari and her brother Said Sikandari

    Najiba Sikandari and her brother Said Sikandari

  • Curators David Wells and Belinda McMartin

    Curators David Wells and Belinda McMartin

  • Photographer Bruce Postle

    Photographer Bruce Postle

  • Bruce Carmichael and Executive Director of the Bradman Museum Rina Hore

    Bruce Carmichael and Executive Director of the Bradman Museum Rina Hore

  • Joy Burch and Mike Coward

    Joy Burch and Mike Coward

  • Mike Coward and Bradman Foundation Chairman Maurice Newman

    Mike Coward and Bradman Foundation Chairman Maurice Newman

Bradman Museum Exhibition at CMAG

13 January 2015

Not really understanding cricket is not necessarily an impediment to enjoying aspects of the game. And learning about it can make a difference as I learnt at the opening of the exhibition at Canberra Museum and Gallery’s Bradman Museum Exhibition and the launch of the book, The Bradman Museum’s World of Cricket written by  Mike Coward with extraordinary photos by Bruce Postle.
The book is an excellent compendium of stories that commentators love but are lost in much of today’s hysteria about the minutiae and mediocre managed to the nth degree by the spinners off the field of play. This beautiful book that my grandfather would have loved – he sat up through the night listening to the tests from England on his trusty bakelite wireless with Alan McGilvray commentating using his famous pencil tapping sound effects system- is old school journalism where the story and many of the photos took some chasing, initiative and determination, that is today a media managed opportunity with no exclusivity and mindless repetition on the 24/7 news cycle
But intriguing at this exhibition opening was the history lesson from the Bradman Museum  curators, David Wells and Belinda McMartin, with tidbits of stuff useful for a day on the green with knowledgeable cricket tragics so you don’t miss an opportunity to show how smart you really are.
For example did you know Bradman played cricket in New York on his ‘extended’honeymoon with an Aussie team along for the ride. At Innisfail Park he was dismissed for a duck. His wife Jessie Bradman probably went shopping at Saks instead. Cricket was a very popular game in the north-east of the USA especially for the gentry – there was a cricket pitch in Central Park - but along came baseball and the ordinary folk found a game that was fast exciting and all done and dusted on the same day. And that I reckon is happening again with the Big Bash and ODI games filling the venues while tedious tests become yawningly boring.
Take time to visit the exhibition, and buy a book from Dymock’s and marvel at the smoke haze of a certain West Indian puffing away. As Mike Coward said once a Rasta always a Rasta.