• Colleen Cuneo

    Colleen Cuneo

  • Anna and Robert Brunato with Centre Manager Amanda Paradiso

    Anna and Robert Brunato with Centre Manager Amanda Paradiso

  • Catherine McCulloch and Jane Kennedy

    Catherine McCulloch and Jane Kennedy

  • Blaire Brown and Carly Brown

    Blaire Brown and Carly Brown

  • Rita Basso and Flavia D'Ambrosio

    Rita Basso and Flavia D'Ambrosio

  • Francesca Droulias and Victoria Schnabl

    Francesca Droulias and Victoria Schnabl

  • Stephanie Cooper, Colleen Cuneo and Carrie Bigg

    Stephanie Cooper, Colleen Cuneo and Carrie Bigg

  • Andie Meredith and Robyn Apps

    Andie Meredith and Robyn Apps

  • Rachelle Dealy and Noorjahan Nizam

    Rachelle Dealy and Noorjahan Nizam

  • Celia Winnett and Jonathan McFeat

    Celia Winnett and Jonathan McFeat

  • Champagne and the art of fashion for the invited......

    Champagne and the art of fashion for the invited......

  • Kimberley Bryant and her dad Ricky Bryant.

    Kimberley Bryant and her dad Ricky Bryant.

  • Megan Lovell and Phoenix McKay

    Megan Lovell and Phoenix McKay

  • Chanel No.5 looking perfect in pink.....

    Chanel No.5 looking perfect in pink.....

  • Seen in the fashion scene......

    Seen in the fashion scene......

  • Kerrie Hess and one of her fashion illustrations for the Canberra Centre

    Kerrie Hess and one of her fashion illustrations for the Canberra Centre

  • Danielle Morris, CEO of Morris Walker prepares to reveal

    Danielle Morris, CEO of Morris Walker prepares to reveal

  • Dashion Illustrator Kerrie Hess

    Dashion Illustrator Kerrie Hess

Canberra Centre - Fashion as Art

27 March 2015

Fashion is a fickle thing. And our relationship with it is a love/hate one. But as it has become an international market with online treasures arriving at your front door in a matter of days we are able to be fashion forward, at the cutting edge and savvy to the vicissitudes of this giant money making machine.

But it is an absolute that we buy most fashion to outdo other women. It is aspirational and we aspire to look like the long legged po faced stick figures of today’s catwalks most with that certain insouciance and seem to have it all in a world where celebrity and the mighty dollar rule.

That said it was deliciously old fashioned to be invited for the Canberra Centre champagne and art event where the stars of the show were just a few of the fashion drawings of Kerrie Hess, an international talent with a string of expensive and fashionable clients and a talent to make the simplest of drawings quite exquisite. Revealed with all the appropriate accompanying build up as MC Colleen Cuneo asked the artist about her fashion, her working environment and what she has in her wardrobe. Now that’s a classic asked over the decades of all and sundry who have, or seem to have, exciting wardrobes and surprise, surprise the answers are always the same. Yes my clever fashion tragics its no secret; black blazer, white shirt, dark blue jeans etc etc. And while I’m often jaded by the obvious it is still a good start to any wardrobe where phfaffing around with the cheap and cheerful will not work and you will be sorry.

The lovely flowing lines of Kerrie Hess’ drawings are the classics of yesteryear – the pink Chanel No 5 would be a sensational boudoir picture - and her love of a different time and fashion aesthetic  makes for great pictures. But it’s not what Canberra women wear; not even at the swankiest of events and this lovely look remains aspirational as most bodies are in the 14/16 range and Spanx are the undies of choice.