• Isabella Ferry, Greta Staufenbiel and Angelica Nikias

    Isabella Ferry, Greta Staufenbiel and Angelica Nikias

  • Melanie Hanson and Aaron Priest

    Melanie Hanson and Aaron Priest

  • Virginia Cater and Maggie Burk

    Virginia Cater and Maggie Burk

  • Ruth Osborne and Belinda Barnes

    Ruth Osborne and Belinda Barnes

  • Michael Rush and his daughter Jacinta Rush

    Michael Rush and his daughter Jacinta Rush

  • Rosemary Hollow and Colin Steele

    Rosemary Hollow and Colin Steele

  • Belinda Barnier and Andrea Manning

    Belinda Barnier and Andrea Manning

  • Chris Young, Annette and Paul Briggs, Belinda Daley and Beverly Hart

    Chris Young, Annette and Paul Briggs, Belinda Daley and Beverly Hart

  • Yvonne Kennedy, Kate Waghord and Brenda Runnegar

    Yvonne Kennedy, Kate Waghord and Brenda Runnegar

Divenire: Melboune Ballet Company @ The Q Theatre

8 July 2016

Divenire with the Melbourne Ballet Company was a program of three short works from a small Melbourne company of exceptional dancers who have between them extensive experience and a refreshing new approach to traditional ballet. They eschew the usual extravagance expected of larger companies and work on a simple formula where the athleticism and precision is evident and the pleasure of their expertise is in the individual as much as in the formality of the work.

A company of just 10 dancers with experience from major ballet companies around the world, Melbourne Ballet Company has set its own agenda creating a company in a city that is home to the Australian Ballet but has found its own identity at another level of performance that is refreshing and unique.

Choreographer Simon Hoy, a former Canberran, choreographed the opening Divenire where the music of Italian composer Ludovico Einaudi dictates the increase in momentum. In Zealots choreographed by Timothy Harbour the impact of the ‘tennis ball’ yellow tights and black footwear is integral to a faster pace with music by John Adams to impel the dancer’s individuality while being together but not manipulating each other. Hoy ‘s closing work was inspired by Picasso’s Guernica, the mural that is the epitome of surrealism and the culmination of Picasso’s journey through different art periods. It was a big finish to the program and elegant and exacting with the male dancers showing their classical techniques so well      

The simplicity of the narrative is not lost in the exacting demands of these works, only enhanced and exploited with this company of dancers pushing the boundaries and finding a different platform for their talents.