• Terry Colwill and Rob King

    Terry Colwill and Rob King

  • Owen Finegan accepting the cheque from Rod Holt

    Owen Finegan accepting the cheque from Rod Holt

  • Gail and Dick Jameson

    Gail and Dick Jameson

  • Eddy Black, David Nolan and Peter McNamara

    Eddy Black, David Nolan and Peter McNamara

  • John Busteed, Gary Kennedy, Owen Finegan and Ken Bateup

    John Busteed, Gary Kennedy, Owen Finegan and Ken Bateup

  • Rod Holt, Quinton White and Kay and Frank Harlovich

    Rod Holt, Quinton White and Kay and Frank Harlovich

  • Cynthia White and Jenny Dyke

    Cynthia White and Jenny Dyke

  • Norm Smith and Brian Carr

    Norm Smith and Brian Carr

  • Ken Bateup and Gary Kennedy

    Ken Bateup and Gary Kennedy

Owen Finegan is a very huggable bear of a man. A giant on the rugby field and a soft hearted gentle giant in his chosen field of work where raising funds for organisations in the NFP arena has seen him make Snowy Hydro SouthCare a household word in the Canberra region. And now that same instinct and intent is going to be a significant to the Kids Cancer Project as their CEO, a position he accepted in April.

Cancer impacts us all in some way, how we act and react is what makes it possible for organisations such as the Kids Cancer Project to finance the best of the best in cancer research because it just isn’t fair that kids get this crappy disease, and they are our responsibility.

Rod Holt I’ve known for many years. His hospitality I’ve enjoyed over the years in groups he’s been a part of and currently with his Gourmet and Friendship – or Grog and Food Club according to the menu - his own bout with cancer was the catalyst to use this club to raise money for the Kids’ Cancer Project. So here we were tucked away in the back room at Teatro Vivaldi, which is akin to the theatre treasure enclave of a London antique shop, wining and dining, and enjoying the reminiscences of Owen Finegan.

The contribution of his organisation to childhood cancer research is enormous and while we’ve seen progress on so many fronts the war against this insidious disease is a long way from being won. With leukaemia 8out of 10 will survive now where it was 2 out of ten not so many years ago. The organisation is also intent on improving the drugs and reducing side effects and toxicity, finding fertility solutions for young people who need to be able to look forward to a normal life after cancer, and being pro-active in the areas of learning difficulties. Finegan’s forte is with corporate sponsorship and using his formidable networks to fund the projects. The Gourmet and Friendship Club’s donation a chance to contribute to something we wish we could fix now.