• Michael Taylor's Mother and Son 1963

    Michael Taylor's Mother and Son 1963

  • Artist Michael Taylor and his painting Monaro Light 1972

    Artist Michael Taylor and his painting Monaro Light 1972

  • Sheridan Burnett and Deb Clark

    Sheridan Burnett and Deb Clark

  • Olive Rigby and Anne Rigby

    Olive Rigby and Anne Rigby

  • Lejla Nikolas and Cornelius Weber

    Lejla Nikolas and Cornelius Weber

  • Peter Robinson, Maggie Taylor, Dale Middleby, Casuarina Forsyth and Louis Robinson

    Peter Robinson, Maggie Taylor, Dale Middleby, Casuarina Forsyth and Louis Robinson

  • Shags and Alex Hobba

    Shags and Alex Hobba

  • Jody Turner, Alistair De Mamiel and Shaya Dashtinezhad

    Jody Turner, Alistair De Mamiel and Shaya Dashtinezhad

  • Mark Bayly and Natalie Beattie

    Mark Bayly and Natalie Beattie

  • Gillian Raymond, Bowie and Hester Pollock and Aaron Pollock

    Gillian Raymond, Bowie and Hester Pollock and Aaron Pollock

  • Brianna Smith and Blaise Taylor

    Brianna Smith and Blaise Taylor

  • Susan Westwood, Chris Johnson and Ann Parkinson

    Susan Westwood, Chris Johnson and Ann Parkinson

  • Nyree Smith and Simone Penkethman

    Nyree Smith and Simone Penkethman

Michael Taylor Survey @ Canberra Museum and Gallery

8 July 2016

The Michael Taylor survey at Canberra Museum and Gallery is like a blast of warmth, colour, texture and joy. An exuberance to take the chill off a cold Canberra night and introduce us to one of our best ‘abstract expressionist ‘ who is not well known but has been painting for 60 years.

Curated by Deb Clark with Sheridan Burnett the exhibition includes 41 paintings and five drawings from a formidable catalogue of work from Taylor’s 60 years of painting the abstraction of the natural environment, many from the National Gallery of Australia’s collection which Gerard Vaughan Director of the NGA who opened the survey said came from an inventory of 128 works they hold.

The adjectives used to describe Taylors work are evocative: “luxuriate in the wetness of the paint” from Vaughan and “vibrant brushwork, scribbles, splatters and stencilled grids” from Clark. But it’s the transitional impact that takes you from an early work Mother and Son 1963, brooding in black and white with shades of grey, to the Monaro Light 1972 with the expansive landscape we rush through to the ski fields, so familiar but finding a softer light and The Dock 2015 where the lushness of the paint and the colour palette is exuberant.

 A quiet shy man, Michael Taylor is not well known in the public arena and seemed happy to wander the exhibition on opening night reticent to bring attention to himself and happy to let his extraordinary survey speak for him. It speaks loudly of his formidable career with just a small collection of his work. See it and be “blown away” at Canberra Museum and Gallery until 2 October.