• Peter Haynes and Louise Doyle

    Peter Haynes and Louise Doyle

  • Neil Doody and Amanda Briggs

    Neil Doody and Amanda Briggs

  • The Dealer is the Devil by Adrian Newstead

    The Dealer is the Devil by Adrian Newstead

  • Patrick Troy and Judith Ajanai

    Patrick Troy and Judith Ajanai

  • Rosie Goldfeder and Diego Ramirez

    Rosie Goldfeder and Diego Ramirez

  • Nancy Severs and Helen Tiernan

    Nancy Severs and Helen Tiernan

  • Tingari Cycle by Dr. George Tjapaltjarri

    Tingari Cycle by Dr. George Tjapaltjarri

  • Lynne Tacy and Bernie Yates

    Lynne Tacy and Bernie Yates

  • Adrian Newstead of Coo-ee Aborifinal Art Gallery

    Adrian Newstead of Coo-ee Aborifinal Art Gallery

  • Lola Wilkins and Jeanette Brand

    Lola Wilkins and Jeanette Brand

  • Christiane Vivanco and David Brand

    Christiane Vivanco and David Brand

  • Chris Stephens and Richard Rowe

    Chris Stephens and Richard Rowe

  • Anna Damiano, Elliot Williams and Beatriz Vivanco

    Anna Damiano, Elliot Williams and Beatriz Vivanco

  • Martin Gascoigne and Adrian Severs

    Martin Gascoigne and Adrian Severs

  • Tambarella (Comet) by Freddie Timms

    Tambarella (Comet) by Freddie Timms

  • Adrian and Anne Newstead

    Adrian and Anne Newstead

  • Old Texas Downs by Queenie McKenzie

    Old Texas Downs by Queenie McKenzie

Nancy Sever's Aboriginal Art Exhibition

13 July 2014

NAIDOC was originally an acronym for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee to acknowledge and celebrate the history culture and achievements of our first Australians but today it names the July events that have spread across Australia to communities finding new and innovative ways to celebrate.

That history, culture and achievement is on display in a significant exhibition of art from four exceptional aboriginal artists - Queenie McKenzie, Freddie Timms, Gloria Petyarre and Dr. George Tjapaltjarri - at Nancy Sever’s Kingston Gallery.

Called Caring for Country, a celestial event is among the paintings of Freddie Timms, and it caught my eye.  ‘Tambarella’ (Comet) is a moment captured by this Kimberley man, a stockman and friend of the great Rover Thomas who had a lasting influence on his work, and is evidence of Timms’ deep sense of attachment to the big sky and the big country of his experience and an ability to paint aerial landscapes. He was obviously gazing skyward at just the right moment and I’d love to know when and where it was.
Gloria Petyarre is an Australian treasure. Her impeccable connections to Aboriginal art heritage is a meander through some fascinating DNA and genetic mixes from Emily, her aunt, to Greeny Purvis Petyarre her cousin. But Gloria is her own woman and the burst of colour, the patterns and optical intensity of her large canvases at the exhibition were a bright spot on a winter’s day.  “Dr.”George Tjapaltjarri didn’t leave the Western Desert until 1964, lived and began painting at Papunya which became a centrifugal force in bringing Aboriginal painting to the art world. The Papunya Painting: Out of the Desert exhibition at the National Museum of Australia in November 2007 a memorable one.

George the Doctor is a medicine man and his disciplined work reflects his knowledge of rituals, body marking and ceremonies, while the lovely work with a palette that softens the contours and profile of her country is that of Queenie McKenzie who captures perfectly the pink tones of the Kimberley, a distinctive aspect of her work. This is an exhibition of four of the best .  
Enjoy the stories for yourself, purchase for pleasure and give our masters of precious and unique Australian Aboriginal art the recognition they deserve until 3 August at Nancy Sever Gallery.