• Ambassador of Portugal Paulo Cunha-Alves and his wife Filomena Cunha-Alves

    Ambassador of Portugal Paulo Cunha-Alves and his wife Filomena Cunha-Alves

  • Rylan Dawson and Georgia Pelle

    Rylan Dawson and Georgia Pelle

  • Director of Pigman's Lament Paulo Castro

    Director of Pigman's Lament Paulo Castro

  • Colin Neve and Caroline Stacey

    Colin Neve and Caroline Stacey

  • Anthony Coxeter and Adelina Larsson

    Anthony Coxeter and Adelina Larsson

  • Rosemary White, Emily Banks and Susan Banks

    Rosemary White, Emily Banks and Susan Banks

  • Stephen Watson and Natalia Selivanov

    Stephen Watson and Natalia Selivanov

  • Grazia Mucciche and Shannon Cuthbertson

    Grazia Mucciche and Shannon Cuthbertson

  • Ruth Pieloor and Ben Crowley

    Ruth Pieloor and Ben Crowley

  • Tom Kitchen and designer Christiane Nowak

    Tom Kitchen and designer Christiane Nowak

Pigman's Lament @ The Street Theatre

24 June 2016

Raoul Cramer’s writer’s notes on the program for Piggy’s Lament give an insight into his writing and the things that he weaves into this story. To read them is to understand much but not all and the result is a complex mix of the blending of a past he is trying to comprehend and reconcile with a grandfather, a fictional character, who was a Fascist, and the today as the single dad with a passion for soccer and two daughters who are part of his life as his absent wife is off somewhere earning the money. Cramer’s plays the role he created melding aspects of his own life which is a melange of German, Indian and English influences and they are integral to this play that has had a four year gestation and much cutting and pasting of the story.

It is funny, painful and fascinating. The unusual and effective set is the design of Christiane Nowak and the direction by Paulo Castro. Castro’s formidable CV as an avant-garde theatre director with international credits and awards brings a formidable collaboration between writer and director.

In the cosy confines of the small theatre at The Street, the intimacy draws you into the secrets of this man, how he deals with it is tortured and ultimately decisive. But is it? This kind of baggage is always difficult to erase and forget.

Pigman’s Lament continues at The Street Theatre until 3 July.