• Susanne Moor and Sofie Fogdem

    Susanne Moor and Sofie Fogdem

  • Damaris Wilson and Dallas Stow

    Damaris Wilson and Dallas Stow

  • Donald and Annie McDowall

    Donald and Annie McDowall

  • Elysia, Antonio and Karen Zeccola

    Elysia, Antonio and Karen Zeccola

  • Geoff and Katerina Prime

    Geoff and Katerina Prime

  • Jeremy Lasek and Coralie Wood

    Jeremy Lasek and Coralie Wood

  • Laura Birn

    Laura Birn

  • Laura Birn, Genevieve Kelly and Laura Munsterhjelm

    Laura Birn, Genevieve Kelly and Laura Munsterhjelm

  • Marina Di Rosso and Stephen Goulding

    Marina Di Rosso and Stephen Goulding

  • Monique Geasley, Kristian Nilsson and Pascale Maddock

    Monique Geasley, Kristian Nilsson and Pascale Maddock

  • Stewart Henderson and Tracey Atherton

    Stewart Henderson and Tracey Atherton

The Scandinavian Film Festival is like a gift that keeps on giving and is a first for Canberra with an opening night featuring a film to love and laugh along with and a stunning Scandinavian blonde actor as the guest of honour.

She is Laura Birn and photographically has an uncanny resemblance to Reeva Steenkamp but is a classy, cool Finn with two of her films featuring at this festival; Heart of a Lion and August Fools and able to enjoy a quick whip around the festivals in Canberra, Sydney and Melbourne not complaining about the weather at all.

“The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared” was the opening night film from an international bestselling book of the same name you should have read and is a preposterous but hilarious journey across Sweden with several deaths by misadventure, an elephant, copious drinking and a cast of characters to delight, with a message to beware of your elderly relative all alone in a nursing home for he or she might when you least expect it surprise you.

The star Allan ( Robert Gustafsson) has had a life of adventure that began with a penchant for blowing things up. Tree stumps, matryoska dolls one by one and by default a philanderer. His fantasmagorical journey through the 20th century meeting Franco, Stalin, Truman, Ronald Reagan and Gorbachev had him working precariously on scaffolding on the Manhattan skyline as well as the Manhatten Project, as a double agent and singularly ordinary kind of man who says the bleeding obvious which gets him bumbling into ridiculous situations.

We partied to start with Lingonberry Cocktails ( Lingonberry jam is a must buy at Ikea) some spicy pork ‘buns’ and at the after-party a smorgasbord of Scandanavian taste treats from Hotel Hotel’s new restaurant Monster, Cake Wines from the Barossa and  finally a quick duck into the new Max Brenner spot for a high octane hot choc to warm up the batteries before heading home.

The Scandinavian Film Festival is on at Palace Electric until 20 July and the program at www.scandinavianfilmfestival.com.