• Alistair Christie and Rev. Joy Bartholomew

    Alistair Christie and Rev. Joy Bartholomew

  • Pam Anderson and Rosemary Thomas

    Pam Anderson and Rosemary Thomas

  • Jennifer Angelatos and her daughter Phoebe Angelatos

    Jennifer Angelatos and her daughter Phoebe Angelatos

  • Helen and Scott Chadwick with Sylvia Egan

    Helen and Scott Chadwick with Sylvia Egan

  • John Robinson with Ruth and Hans Mol

    John Robinson with Ruth and Hans Mol

  • Margaret McAuslan and Alastair Christie

    Margaret McAuslan and Alastair Christie

  • Church elders cut the ribbon for the 'Living Stones' exhibition

    Church elders cut the ribbon for the 'Living Stones' exhibition

  • Rev David Campbell

    Rev David Campbell

  • Iris Campbell and Margaret Stibbs

    Iris Campbell and Margaret Stibbs

  • David Bull and Barbara Petersen

    David Bull and Barbara Petersen

  • Christine Biggs and Rev. Dr Campbell Egan

    Christine Biggs and Rev. Dr Campbell Egan

  • The original St Andrew's manse now used as church offices

    The original St Andrew's manse now used as church offices

  • Ann Logan

    Ann Logan

The Presbyterian Church of St Andrew : Heritage Exhibition

2 April 2016

Most of St Andrews Presbyterian Church is surrounded by beautiful mature trees that give it a modicum of seclusion and sound diffusion from the traffic on State Circle. But it stands imposingly on one of the best sights on offer in the early days of Canberra when denominations were offered a choice for their churches, and is inextricably linked to so much of our early history.

To celebrate that and bring the recorded history up to date the Canberra and Region Heritage Festival Grants Program was an opportunity to create what they’ve called the “Living Stones” Exhibition now open in the original St Andrew’s manse and link it with an ‘open church’ opportunity to participate in a tour and talk, with a group of volunteers well schooled in all aspects of this beautiful church.

For the opening morning as we crunched along the crunchy paths it was back to familiar territory of decades ago when my Grandmother, who knew everyone, would potter along with us in tow to a wedding, christening or funeral as she loved all that ceremony no matter the denomination. It was a chore for us rather than a pleasure. But the interior of the magnificent stained glass windows is still firmly imprinted on my memory.

To have Ann Logan explain the detail and history of those windows was a new perspective and explained for me the cute little pulpit that opens to the outside on the eastern side of the church. To preach from that pulpit would sadly now be a sermon to the carpark where in keeping with the precious value of parking land around the triangle the churches are value adding where they can. But to imagine an Anzac Day service – the pulpit opens off the Peace Memorial Nave - or a peace focused service is surely an option.

And when you go to the church and the exhibition take time to gaze up the spire where halfway up you’ll see a small ‘gargoyle’ beneath the gutter. When we were little it was purported to have been carved by one of the stonemasons who worked on the building in memory of his dog. I don’t want to know that it’s not true.

For more information and how to take advantage of the exhibition and tours contact the Church Office or the website