• Samantha Sweeney, Keill Harrison, Joe Lloyd and Mikayla Lewis

    Samantha Sweeney, Keill Harrison, Joe Lloyd and Mikayla Lewis

  • Rachel Rooney, Ashleigh Buckley and Tegan Mulquiney.

    Rachel Rooney, Ashleigh Buckley and Tegan Mulquiney.

  • Olivia Hoitink, Rhys Coles, Indica Burnet and Aaron Sharp

    Olivia Hoitink, Rhys Coles, Indica Burnet and Aaron Sharp

  • Mary Hill and Lottie Le"Strange

    Mary Hill and Lottie Le"Strange

  • Mark Will, Joy Burch, Julie Murkins and Danuta Mrowka

    Mark Will, Joy Burch, Julie Murkins and Danuta Mrowka

  • Kyle Leditsehke and Zoe McDonald

    Kyle Leditsehke and Zoe McDonald

  • Inside Amy Collins' exhibit Blood and Orchids

    Inside Amy Collins' exhibit Blood and Orchids

  • Amy Collins and Max Albert

    Amy Collins and Max Albert

  • Julie Murkins and Cassidy Richens

    Julie Murkins and Cassidy Richens

  • A kaleidescope of colour by Josh Peisley

    A kaleidescope of colour by Josh Peisley

  • "Destroying forest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal"     Edward O. Wilson

    "Destroying forest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal" Edward O. Wilson

  • Amy Collins

    Amy Collins

  • Abiah Bull and Callum Feint

    Abiah Bull and Callum Feint

  • Abby Knoester and Josh Peisley

    Abby Knoester and Josh Peisley

  • Murder She Wrote.... and illustrated

    Murder She Wrote.... and illustrated

TONE, COLOUR & SPACE : an annual festival of performing and visual arts by Lake Tuggeranong College students was opened by Joy Burch at the Tuggeranong Arts Centre. It is a new approach to give students the chance to perform and exhibit in a community space and is an ideal partnership with the Art Centre and a valuable opportunity to experience the transition from school to community.

And it would seem these students are doing just fine. Their enthusiasm well nurtured and harnessed with some exceptional work in the art exhibition with drama, music and singing on show and the most fascinating and thought provoking display of ‘book reconstruction’. It probably has a special name as an art form and lets be honest it would be difficult to display around the family home, but I loved the detail and thought behind the de/reconstruction.

Amy Collins found a book from Hawaii in the 1920s called Blood and Orchids by Norman Katkov. “Not very well written” according to Amy but with a south- seas décor, a bottle of gin and  some playing cards hidden inside – it was prohibition time - and distinctly 20’s additions it becomes a funky edition of a forgotten book.

You could almost hear the crunch of leaves and smell the forest floor perusing the reconstruction of a book with a quote from American biologist and expert in ants Edward O. Wilson who said “destroying forest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal” . But to light up your world the painting that is a kaleidoscope of colour and detail by Josh Peisley, and 55 hours in the making is a stunner.

The exhibition continues until 13 September.