• Artist Emilie Patteson and her work 'Turning of the tides'.

    Artist Emilie Patteson and her work 'Turning of the tides'.

  • Emilie Patteson's 'Turning of the tides'

    Emilie Patteson's 'Turning of the tides'

  • Dan Power's intricate pen and ink detail on a bull's skull.

    Dan Power's intricate pen and ink detail on a bull's skull.

  • 'Shrinking reef' by Barbie Kjar.

    'Shrinking reef' by Barbie Kjar.

  • Canberra glass artist Jenni Kemarre Martiniello and her 'Parachilna bicornal set'

    Canberra glass artist Jenni Kemarre Martiniello and her 'Parachilna bicornal set'

  • 'Auroranite' by Elizabeth Kelly.

    'Auroranite' by Elizabeth Kelly.

  • Artist Ulan Murray and his work 'Abor sole'

    Artist Ulan Murray and his work 'Abor sole'

  • 'Neopolitan bonbonaparte' by Julia deVille

    'Neopolitan bonbonaparte' by Julia deVille

  • Director, National Archives of Australia David Fricker

    Director, National Archives of Australia David Fricker

  • Janita Byrne and Paloma Lopez

    Janita Byrne and Paloma Lopez

  • Dani Wickman, Stephen Ellis and Julie Faulkner

    Dani Wickman, Stephen Ellis and Julie Faulkner

  • Louise Doyle, Ambassador Designate of Finland Lars Bakstrom, Brian Oldman and Brigitta Bakstrom

    Louise Doyle, Ambassador Designate of Finland Lars Bakstrom, Brian Oldman and Brigitta Bakstrom

  • Samantha Rutter and Shaun Rohrlach

    Samantha Rutter and Shaun Rohrlach

  • Anne Lyons and Jo Wilson

    Anne Lyons and Jo Wilson

  • Neil Doody and Amanda Briggs with Beverly Growden

    Neil Doody and Amanda Briggs with Beverly Growden

  • Gillian Savage and Alison Daley.

    Gillian Savage and Alison Daley.

  • Katrina Nipschke and Tanya Ha

    Katrina Nipschke and Tanya Ha

  • Janelle Wilson, Tania Zora, Charlie Clifford and Elizabeth Masters

    Janelle Wilson, Tania Zora, Charlie Clifford and Elizabeth Masters

  • Peter Ryan, Becky Schmidt and Rachel Burns

    Peter Ryan, Becky Schmidt and Rachel Burns

  • Shaun Rohrlach, Ulan Murray and Katrina Nipschke

    Shaun Rohrlach, Ulan Murray and Katrina Nipschke

  • Denise and Terry Patteson with Danilo Enders-Moje.

    Denise and Terry Patteson with Danilo Enders-Moje.

Waterhouse Natural Science Prize 2016

15 September 2016

The Waterhouse Natural Science Prize is a treasure in the field of art awards and an annual visitor to the National Archives of Australia where a selection of the finalists is now on show. There’s been a brief twelve month hiatus when the powers that be at the Museum of South Australia decided to simplify the prize categories with two main sections, Open and Emerging Artists. And what an eclectic mix of entries this year.

Thought provoking and diverse the entries take us to issues where the artists can use subtlety, bold and beautiful expressions of an aspect of the natural world and bring to our attention areas we must as a world community be concerned about from the artists’ perspectives That art can do this is  beautiful, confronting and inspiring.

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize was instigated in 2002 to honour and commemorate the first curator of the South Australian Museum Frederick George Waterhouse and it continues to inspire the artists who today have a plethora of scientific information in the international environmental debate to disseminate. It has an international impact too with entries over the years from 30 different countries.

Emilie Patteson’s ‘Turning of the tides ‘ is of blown, hot sculpted and assembled glass with dried seaweed that appears to be of containers filled with a viscous material to let the organic material float so to hear that it’s all glass was to gaze at a perfect preservation of good old dried seaweed and marvel at the creation.

Julia deVille’s ‘Neopolitan bonbonaparte’ has three chicks, coloured in the three shades of a Neopolitan ice cream with chick chocolate, chick vanilla and chick strawberry sitting in a beautiful antique silver spoon. Once such a chic ice cream I’ll never eat it again!

Ulan Murray’s ‘Abor sole’is akin to a metal Bonsai plant with the above ground perfection and the long tendrils of roots underground, but with recycled copper and steel used to create it becomes a sculptural piece of delicate beauty.

An exhibition to enjoy visually, to understand by reading the accompanying notes and be amazed at the extensive variety of media used by these talented artists.