• Louise Maher and Suki Sadik

    Louise Maher and Suki Sadik

  • Anthony Toms and Chief Minister Andrew Barr

    Anthony Toms and Chief Minister Andrew Barr

  • Denise Skea, Karen Loutit, Sonia Owens and Koula Notaras

    Denise Skea, Karen Loutit, Sonia Owens and Koula Notaras

  • Mike Willoughby with his daughters Sian and Grace Willoughby

    Mike Willoughby with his daughters Sian and Grace Willoughby

  • Meralyn Bubeak, with Bob and Lindy Ross

    Meralyn Bubeak, with Bob and Lindy Ross

  • Sophia Brady and Hannah Walker

    Sophia Brady and Hannah Walker

  • John Lombard, Samara Purnell and Joe Woodward

    John Lombard, Samara Purnell and Joe Woodward

  • Catherine Wood with Jack, Max and mum, Gil Hugonnet

    Catherine Wood with Jack, Max and mum, Gil Hugonnet

  • Tim Brand and Phoebe Riorden

    Tim Brand and Phoebe Riorden

  • Henry and Dianna Laska

    Henry and Dianna Laska

  • The cast of Wuthering Heights, Tim Dashwood, Nick Skubij, Nelle Lee, Gemma Willing, Linden Wilkinson and Ross Balbuziente

    The cast of Wuthering Heights, Tim Dashwood, Nick Skubij, Nelle Lee, Gemma Willing, Linden Wilkinson and Ross Balbuziente

Wuthering Heights @ The Playhouse

9 March 2016

Wuthering Heights, the Emily Bronte classic, has been shaken and stirred by ‘shake & stir’ theatre company into a 21st century version to break the hearts of those who fell in love reading the original story with the brooding Heathcliff from rough gypsy stock, as the short dark and handsome Ross Balbuziente steps into the role where actors who’ve gone before have soared and turns him into a nasty piece of work brilliantly.

There’s plenty of very effective thunder, lightning, rain and wind to open this version of the play, and continue the theme throughout of miserable moors weather, as diaphanous curtains billow and very large photographs of the cast in various stages of barking mad behavior fade in and out while the real actors behave badly on stage.
To suit a younger audience liberties are taken with the story line, the current vernacular slips in, but that is second nature to today’s bratty youth and the narration formula using the only sensible character in the whole Bronte story, Nellie Dean (Linden Wilkinson) to whip us through the years of this gothic story while all you want to do is get the old wooden spoon out and stop the grandiloquent posturing.

But I did enjoy it because sometimes you just have to shake and stir the old stuff to get rid of the mothballs and fluff out a story more suited to today’s audiences. They’ve done it well. A martini shaken and stirred at the after party would have been the perfect finish.

Continues at The Playhouse until 12 March.